Here are some of the most commonly asked questions about how to start and run a successful home daycare

 QUESTION:

I am a child care provider in which all of my children are state assisted (SRS). I have 7 of them. These children don’t attend the daycare when their parents aren’t working (I don’t get paid for these times either). On some occasions I end up with a day off. The problem is I can’t seem to get these parents to give me a courtesy call to let me know that their child is not attending on that day. I have even enclosed a statement in my parent agreement package that request this call. I ask the parents to call if your child will be attending late. After 9:00 am or not coming at all. This will help plan my day. Also if no-one is coming maybe I can get an errand or two completed. Some of my parents have waited until the middle of the day (after 2:00 pm & I close at 5:30 pm) to bring their child without notice. Am I wrong if I am away when they decide to bring their child, or turn them away because I have accepted drop ins and want to keep from being over capacity for that day? Should I stay home and turn away the drop in income?

ANSWER:
Although I encourage all providers to set regular hours, there are certain cases, such as yours, where there should be some variation.

Due to the fact that you are only paid when children are present, you need to make it understood by the parents that you are making some changes to your policy.

I would suggest adding an addendum to your contract that states:
If your child is not present by 9:00 a.m., your child will be considered absent and care WILL NOT be available for the rest of that day, unless arrangements are made by phone prior to 9:00 a.m.

Use that as your guideline and if you have no children by 9:00 a.m., plan the rest of your day, run errands, accept drop in’s etc.

Make sure you create this as an addendum to your Contract and have the parents sign it!

There may be a few uncomfortable instances where parents disregard the notice and show up while you are away or when you have taken in drop in children. Should this happen, you will need to stand firm, act in a professional manner and let them know, that these situations can be avoided in the future, if they call or arrive by 9:00 a.m.

QUESTION:
How can I make the adjustment of operating a new home daycare a positive experience for my children and myself?

ANSWER:
Talk to your children and prepare them for what is about to take place in your home. If possible keep special toys, belongings and their rooms off limits to the daycare children. At the end of each day, spend quality time with your children, cuddle read to them and let them know how much you love them. Positively reinforce their good behavior during daycare hours with hugs and compliments. Allowing transition time and carefully screening your daycare families will assist your children in adjusting to their new environment and your new business.

QUESTION:
I recently enrolled a daycare family, who requested that I care for their children on Veteran’s Day, even though it states in my contract, that I’m closed. I hesitantly agreed, and on Veteran’s Day, they didn’t show up! I waited until for several hours and called them. The dad apologize and said his wife was out of town, he thought I was closed and had arranged for a back up sitter. I told him I would have to enforce the rules in my contract which state a charge for not notifying me and for not showing up. He agreed to pay the charge. I feel very uncomfortable about tomorrow morning when I have to see them face to face. Did I do the right thing?

ANSWER:
Yes!!! You handled the situation perfectly. Don’t feel uncomfortable, that is why you have a contract. You have simply enforced your rules. I have one suggestion……..don’t offer to open on your days off, it is the parents responsibility to provide back up care, unless otherwise stated in your contract. You did a great job! Keep enforcing those rules, you have laid the ground work with this family and they will either respect you and follow your rules or move on.

QUESTION:
Is there a certain amount of time that a child can spend in a daycare or home daycare center on a daily basis. I am writing from Oklahoma so I guess I would need to know the Oklahoma Law. If there is such a law then who would need to be contacted to get this type of neglect stopped?

ANSWER:
According to the National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care, there are no federal regulations specifically governing child care operations and each state has different licensing requirements. I checked with the State of Oklahoma and there does not seem to be any ruling pertaining to the length of time a child can remain in childcare. If you are a daycare provider, your contract should state the length of time a child can remain in your care each day. If you feel the child is being neglected, then you need to report that Neglect to the state in which you are licensed. If you’d like to see a change in the rules for your state, then I would recommend you contact the licensing agency for your state.

QUESTION:
What if you think abuse is being done to a child you are caring for? I know you can call the police, but that will only scared the abuser into denial and then it comes back on the daycare worker. Is is okay to ask for a paper from the doctor showing up to date shots and a physical exam record? I know of one case now that really concerns me and I am unsure (and scared) that the child will be in more danger if I speak to the police. And ir I do not speak-then what?

ANSWER: Remember that your Childcare Business is YOUR business. You can ask the parents for whatever information you wish. Asking for a copy of current medical reports which include immunizations would be one approach, but what will that prove? If you truly believe that the CHILD IS IN DANGER, then you need to report the abuse IMMEDIATELY.

As a Daycare Provider, you are a mandated reporter of suspected abuse. Contact the state for which you are licensed and ask questions. Keep track of all your suspicisions, in that child’s file, include the date and reason why you suspect the abuse. If you are UNSURE, or if you feel like the child will be in MORE danger if you report the abuse, then you need to tell your state contact exactly how you feel. Keep notes of the conversation as well, for your records. IF YOU DO NOTHING and the child is injured seriously or killed, what will your liability be then? How will you live with that for the rest of your life? I know this is a difficult decision, but some action will need to be taken. TO ALL PROVIDERS: If you have not received training from your State on how to recognize and report abuse, then I recommend you seek such training. If it isn’t available, then ask them where you can obtain booklets or more information.

QUESTION:
I have a parent who has left my care and is now refusing to pay me and is not returning my phone calls. I spoke to one provider and she said “She has one parent that owes her a big lump some of money but there is nothing for us providers to do. Is that true?

ANSWER:
There are several things you can do. First make sure that each Daycare Family has signed a contract stating your rates, pay dates, fees and policies. Maintain accurate Daily Attendance Records. For a parent who has left your care and is not returning phone calls, I would suggest sending him/her a letter by registered mail so they have to sign for it. Include a copy of your contract with the dates of payment, rates and fees highlighted.

If the parents do not respond, then contact a collection agency and establish an account so they can assist you in collecting funds or proceed to Small Claims Court. Be sure to keep copies of everything you send to the parents and note down the dates and times you called them.

QUESTION:
I have a contract full of rules but I still have parents who refuse to follow them. Their children bring food and drinks from home which is ruining my carpeting. Even though I have charges for late pickups and early drop off’s, people are still showing up hours early or late.

ANSWER:
First, I’m glad to hear you are using a contract. That is the very first step to success in your business. The second of course is enforcing the rules and policies that you have in your contract. Fees for being late or early, should be charged without exception! Reflect those charges on their bill, so they can see how much extra they are paying for breaking the rules. If you have not established a limit as to the number of times a rule can be broken, then do so and stick to it. Providers often work long hours as it is and having children into the late evening is bound to take it’s toll on you and your family. As for food and drinks. Post a note by the front door that says, no food and drink! If they bring it in, then intercept it at the door and ask the parents to take it home. Remember, it’s your home and business. Even though dealing with these situations can be frustrating, if they are “nipped” in the “bud” from the beginning, it will set a precidence for what you will and won’t tolerate.

QUESTION:
I have a very busy and aggressive eight month old. He is only trying to “check” out the other baby I care for but often times scares her. He has been crawling and climbing on furniture for two months and is quite advanced compared to the other infant. I just don’t know how to go about getting him to stop. Mostly I don’t like the hitting and “kissing” he does to her. I have tried saying Nice and rubbing her cheek with his hand instead of No! as I don’t want him to think he can’t touch her. Any other suggestions? She is beginning to cry when he looks at her. Separating them is not an option. Help!!

ANSWER:
I have a couple of suggestions for you. Consider purchasing a “baby doll” for him. Use it as a substitute whenever his curiosity starts to overwhelm the other baby. Use the doll as a model for how he should be treating her. Hug the doll and use phrases like “Be gentle” and your phrase “Nice”. Hug and love on the doll just as you would the real baby. Hand it to him and encourage him to play with it instead of her. I would keep the doll out of sight and use is specifically for this purpose. Climbing is part of all babies’ development and he will continue to be more mobile as he gets older. I would encourage you to purchase a small indoor climb on structure. When he attempts to climb on your furniture, remove him and place him within reach of the structure.

QUESTION:
I am a new subscriber with a small problem that I’m not really sure if I handled it correctly. I would like to know if there is a right or wrong way to do it. I got a call from a Mom checking out her options in day care for her child. She wanted to start her child in June. We talked on the phone and I told her at this time I have a spot open for her child. She came over and did a quick drop in visit, at that time I gave her all the information as if she where going to start, to help her with the decision-making. She told me she had a few other places to check out and would get back to me. Well, two weeks went by and I haven’t heard from her. I got a call from a different Mom that needs childcare. Since I hadn’t heard from her I took this child. I called the first Mom back to be nice and told her that I filled the spot. She was not happy because she thought it was a done deal. But I told her that when she left here she told me that she was still looking and would get back to me. I told her that of she wanted I would get a hold of the other Mom and see if she had someone else in mind to watch her child. To see if the spot could be opened (not that I wanted to do this). I told the first Mom that if that happened she would need to pay me a holding fee to hold that spot because I a bills that have to be paid too. She did not like the idea of paying me if her child wouldn’t be here. I can’t blame her but I need the income too. I guess my question to everyone is how could I have handled this differently? And does anyone else hold spots for a fee? How big of a fee?

ANSWER:
When you did not hear back from the first family, I would have called and confirmed their decision prior to enrolling the second family. This is not to say that you have to select the first family, it’s just an act of professional courtesy. If both families wish to enroll, this provides you with the opportunity to choose which family you wish to work with. As for charging a holding fee, I would suggest a minimum of $50 and be selective of the length of time that you hold spots. I would also like to add, there is not necessarily a right or wrong way to operate your business. The policies you implement are of your choosing, unless otherwise directed by your licensing agency. There should never be a time for you to explain why you charge a fee, it’s simply your policy and that’s all they need to know.

QUESTION:
I have a small problem that I’m not really sure if I handled it correctly. I would like to know if there is a right or wrong way to do it. I got a call from a Mom checking out her options in day care for her child. She wanted to start her child in June. We talked on the phone and I told her at this time I have a spot open for her child. She came over and did a quick drop in visit, at that time I gave her all the information as if she where going to start, to help her with the decision-making. She told me she had a few other places to check out and would get back to me. Well, two weeks went by and I haven’t heard from her. I got a call from a different Mom that needs childcare. Since I hadn’t heard from her I took this child. I called the first Mom back to be nice and told her that I filled the spot. She was not happy because she thought it was a done deal. But I told her that when she left here she told me that she was still looking and would get back to me. I told her that of she wanted I would get a hold of the other Mom and see if she had someone else in mind to watch her child. To see if the spot could be opened (not that I wanted to do this). I told the first Mom that if that happened she would need to pay me a holding fee to hold that spot because I a bills that have to be paid too. She did not like the idea of paying me if her child wouldn’t be here. I can’t blame her but I need the income too. I guess my question to everyone is how could I have handled this differently? And does anyone else hold spots for a fee? How big of a fee?

ANSWER:
When you did not hear back from the first family, I would have called and confirmed their decision prior to enrolling the second family. This is not to say that you have to select the first family, it’s just an act of professional courtesy. If both families wish to enroll, this provides you with the opportunity to choose which family you wish to work with. As for charging a holding fee, I would suggest a minimum of $50 and be selective of the length of time that you hold spots. I would also like to add, there is not necessarily a right or wrong way to operate your business. The policies you implement are of your choosing, unless otherwise directed by your licensing agency. There should never be a time for you to explain why you charge a fee, it’s simply your policy and that’s all they need to know.

QUESTION:
During Spring Break I cared for two girls ages 7 and 8 for a friend. The week was a complete disaster-they broke toys and furniture in my home and were extremely disrespectful. How do you deal with unruly children?

ANSWER: On the first day of care for any child, regardless of who they belong too, make the rules of your home daycare perfectly clear.

If the children do not listen, or follow the rules then apply the appropriate discipline. It is imperative that you be consistent and follow through after every warning.

Although dealing with unruly children is part of our jobs as Daycare Providers. This does not mean , that you have to care for every child that you enroll indefinitely. Sometimes you have to decide if caring for a child that is unruly is worth the toll it takes on you and your other children.

Although some wear and tear is to be expected, there should never be a time when toys and/or furniture are destroyed on purpose. If the latter were the case, make the parents aware of the damage or excessive behavior and ask for their assistance in correcting the behavior.

Do not allow unruly children or parents to take over your home, even if they are friends or family. This constant disruption will affect you, your children and your business.

QUESTION:
I have a 6 yr old girl who happens to be my own that whines all the time and for everything. I run an in-home daycare and wonder if this could be her way of trying to get my attention or is this just another one of those girl stages? How can I make it stop?—-Carol Lynn from Nova Scotia, Canada

ANSWER:
Hi Carol, I think the first step in curbing the whining is evaluating when and why she is doing it. Is it when you are busy with other children? Is it when she’s not getting her way? Is it when you are on the phone? If you find that her whining occurs when you are spending time with another child, you may be able to stop the whine before it starts. An example: You are going in to change a toddler’s diaper. You look at your daughter and say something to the effect “Susie, I’m going to be changing Johnny’s diaper, can you be a be girl and keep an eye on things for me? This will give her a feeling of importance and may distract her from whining. Another might be: The phone is ringing which usually leads to a major episode of whining by your daughter. Before you get on the phone, quickly ask her to do something for you. “Can you get me a pen and paper, this call is going to be important, so I’ll need your help?” Again, this may help change her mindset. Another way to handle whining would be using body language and/or imitation. Example Scenario: Your child is whining.. You hold your hand up and say, “Stop!” I can’t hear you when you talk like that. Can you please talk like a big girl? OR Your child is whining… You repeat whatever she said in your best whine voice. Then ask her if she liked it when you talked that way. Chances are she may giggle, but will say no. Then repeat the words again using your regular voice and ask her-Doesn’t it sound better when I talk like this? Mommy likes it when you talk like a big girl. I’ll talk like a big girl from now on, if you will. When using this method be sure to use a positive tone. You don’t want to humiliate her, you want her to hear the difference and set an example. Be sure to compliment her when she does speak in her regular voice- Great job Susie! I love it when you talk like a big girl! What you have to remember is this is just a stage. If you handle it right and be positive and consist, it should pass.

QUESTION:
I am a new childcare provider and I am interested in some tips on children’s activities. I have a varied range of ages the youngest at 11 weeks, 12 weeks, 22 months, 2 yrs. 3 years and the oldest at 6. Can you provide some tips on activities and games that would be fun for all?

ANSWER:
Providing activities and games for a mixed age group can often be a challenge, but with a little imagination, you can usually accommodate everyone. An example: You’ve chosen finger painting for an activity. Place infants and toddlers in high chairs or boosters with trays near your activity area. Provide finger paints and paper for the older children. For younger children provide pre-made pudding and paper. This allows the younger children to participate in the same activity, but you do not have to worry about them eating the paint. As you can see by the example provided, you can often manipulate a project just enough to allow the majority of the children to participate. When including infants, place them near the activity, so they can see and hear what the others are doing, but be sure they do not get over stimulated by activity you choose

QUESTION:
I plan to open my daycare at home early next year. Though there is so much to do to prepare for this day, I have one major concern. I have an autistic child and wonder how I can take care of her when she arrives home from school everyday (around 3:00 or so) and be able to watch the other children at the same time. She is a high functioning child and likes to play like other children do. She is also a very good kid and is not disruptive and usually plays quietly. If she spends time with me at the daycare while I’m working then that’s okay. However, if she wants to spend time in her bedroom or any other part of the house, how will I be able to watch her and take care of the kids at the daycare? Any advise?

ANSWER:
Is it possible to set up “mini” play areas in other parts of our home, so you can supervise both your child and your daycare children, if she should decide to play in her room or other areas? Since your primary concern is after school, I’m wondering if you can’t prepare a schedule that would encourage your daughter to stay in the same area of the home that you and the other children are in. Example: Your daughter arrives at 3 pm 3-3:30 Snack Time 3:30-4:00 Story Time 4:00-5:00 Art Project The activities should be those that would interest all of the children, but possibly you could cater the interests of your daughter to encourage her participation. Another option is to offer care only until 3:00 pm each day. There are parents seeking part time care. If you chose this option, you could contact other providers in your area to see if they are turning away part time children.

QUESTION:
I just started my in home childcare and I already have an issue with a parent, my only client. In my contract, my hours read: Care shall be provided normally from 6:30 to 5:00 Monday through Friday. The children come at 7:00 and don’t leave until 5:00. I’m charging her by the day at $15 per day per child. The mother gets out of work at 2:45 and goes hunting, does errands, and takes “mommy time” after work. I have concerns about the children since they spend so much time here. I confronted her with this in attempt to have her come earlier and really upset her. I just feel that I should be caring for her children while she is working and that’s it. It’s really not my problem if she doesn’t want to spend quality time with her kids, but how do I word it in my contract so this doesn’t happen to me again. It’s an awfully long day for them and me. Thanks, Jess from Maine.

ANSWER:
Hi Jess, There are a few issues I think you need to consider addressing. To begin with you need to resolve this situation with your Daycare Family. Then you need to adjust your contract or hours of operation for future families, not only to limit the amount of time children are in your care, but so that you can reach the parents in the event of an emergency.

1) To remedy your existing situation, I suggest writing an “Addendum” to your Contract that says if the children are in your care more than 8 hours a day; you will charge her an additional fee-$10.00 per hour or day.

2) While this mom is out running errands, do you have a way to contact her? If she has a cell phone or pager and you have that information, great, you don’t need to go any further. However, if she is unavailable for 2-3 hours a day and you are unable to reach her that is not acceptable. Make sure you have information on how to contact others during that time period. As for preventing this from happening in the future, I notice your hours of operation are from 6:30 am to 5:00 pm, have you considered reducing your work hours? Why not focus your business on other families with a work schedule similar to this family, so you care only open from 7:00 to 3:00?

One of the hardest parts of being a provider is trying to understand the parents. What we have to keep in mind as providers is that those parents are paying us to provide quality childcare for their children. Even if we do not agree with how they are raising their children, we need to be professionals and establish rules and policies to reduce the amount of friction that can occur when those situations arise.

QUESTION:
I just started my daycare and I am caring for two 2 year olds (one of them my own) and a 1 1/2 year old. Could you please suggest some activities for that age group especially since we will be inside a lot for the next few winter months? I just started this week and I feel like I have no clue what I am doing cause I am sitting down trying to do these activities that I have on my schedule but the kids will only sit down for 3 minutes and then they start running around again. Please help.

ANSWER:
As you know with a 2 year old of your own, the attention span at that age is limited. At this age they need the freedom to move from activity to activity at their discretion. Your role as the caregiver is to engage in mutual play with the children, encourage them to play individually and as a group, to offer a safe and nurturing environment, age appropriate toys and activities and a flexible schedule. Have your play area set up to encourage movement and manipulation of objects. Offer planned activities that are age appropriate to introduce them to music, coloring, painting, etc., but alternate these planned activities with those the children choose. For example: If they choose at that moment to play with the Toy Farm, sit down with them and sing Old McDonald. Discuss the names of the animals that go with the Farm, What sounds they make and what colors they are. It sounds like you are off to a great start by following a schedule, which is important for Naps, Snacks, Meals and Diaper Changes, but at the Toddler Stage you really need to offer flexibility with the activities you plan.

QUESTION:
I have been doing childcare in my home for 4 years. And in that time I have only taken a 4 week maternity leave without pay. I do receive paid holidays for Christmas, Thanksgiving, and The fourth of July. I was wondering if anyone out there has in their contracts about a paid vacation. How can I explain to my families that I want a weeks paid vacation? Longing for a break in ND

ANSWER:
The most important thing you need to remember is that your Home Daycare is a business, and you are the proprietor. It’s up to you not only to set your rates, but to determine when you are closed and if you are paid for those closures.

You can provide for Vacation Income in several ways:

One: Increase your rates and start a vacation fund. You can do this by calculating your current weekly average, then dividing this by the number of weeks in the year. Increase your rates by this amount and then deposit it into your Vacation Fund.

EXAMPLE:
Current Weekly Daycare Income = $500
Divided by 52 =$9.16 per week
Divide this by the number of children in your care $9.16 divided by 5 children=$1.90 per child
This would increase each childs weekly rate by $1.90 or $7.60 per month

Two: Make it clear in your contract that you take one or two weeks paid vacation. If it’s not already stated in your contract, notify the parents at least 30 days in advance in writing that you will me making an amendment to your contract. Then make those changes within your contract by rewriting it, or by adding an addendum to your existing contract. Keep your new terms short and to the point.

QUESTION:
I have been a home daycare provider for about 6 months. One of the biggest issues I am dealing with is handling the “attitudes” I get from parents in response to enforcing the rules in my contract. What can I do to deal with these attitudes and possibly prevent it from happening in the future? Barbara, Boston

ANSWER:
Unfortunately, there isn’t a cut and dry answer to your question. Dealing with “attitudes” of other people is a part of everyday life. Everyone reacts differently to situations that arise and regardless of the position you hold, employee, employer, parent, or business owner; you have to deal with these “attitudes” and reactions professionally. I firmly believe that many of the issues that arise during the course of operating a home daycare or any business for that matter, is clearing defining your rules and policies. This can be accomplished by stating the information in your contact and discussing these issues with the families during the interview process. Here’s an example: Scenario: Your contract not only states a late fee, but a clause: “Care will not be available for payment not received within 1 business day of the due date” Parent: A parent picks up their children. On their way out the door, they say “I don’t have the money to pay you for 3 days.” Provider: “Please remember, our contract states a daily late fee, which will be added to your total childcare costs for this week. I will not be able to provide childcare services until this payment is made in full.” The parent may react in many different ways to your response of non payment. If they get upset, stay calm and simply remind them that you are providing a service, which you need to be paid for on time, just as they receive their paycheck from their employer. Do NOT let the situation escalate into a confrontation! Stay calm and professional! Dealing with the reactions from parents, can be difficult, but you cannot take it personally You need to act professionally, even if they don’t.

QUESTION:
I was in the middle of preparing lunch for my daycare children when an agent from the State Licensing Agency arrived to perform a surprise visit. Even though I passed the inspection, I felt very frustrated and inadequate as a provider because I had to stop what I was doing in order to satisfy the representative. The kids went nuts because they were hungry and tired of waiting for me to finish with the inspection. How can I avoid this situation in the future? Sally, California

ANSWER:
Although you are governed by the licensing agency and or food program sponsors (who also may do unannounced visits), it’s your home and your business and above all the children are your main PRIORITY. Ask the agent or representative to sit in an area of your home until you can satisfactorily complete the task you are in the midst of. Once the children have been taken care of, then complete the inspection and concerns if any of the representative. You have the right to ask this of the agency, and they should respect your request, after all that’s why they are in your home. To ensure the safety and well being of the children in your care.

QUESTION:
I work in a nursery for a fitness center, and there is this one 13 month old little girl that is so clingy with me. She goes into hysterical crying fits if I put her down when other kids are in the room, and she even crys when I just pay attention to the other kids. If it is just she and I in the room then she is the best baby but as soon as other kids enter she throws a fit. I can’t handle her and all the other kids unless she stops crying. I’ve talked to her mom about it and her mom said she does the same thing at Mother’s day out, unless she gets all the attention she throws a fit. And she is a second baby not even the first. What should I do? ~Danñette Espinosa Nursery Director Midland, TX

ANSWER:
I’m not sure how long this child has been in your care, but it sounds like she may be new to your setting. Dealing with this behavior will take ALOT of patience on your part and some creativity, simply because what works with one child, may not work with another. She probably views the other children as a threat-because they will take your attention away from her. I would suggest making the entrance of the children, “warm and fuzzy”, creating an environment where she feels “special” by announcing the arrival of “her friends” who are here to play with her. Here’s an example: When other children enter the setting, try to have a fun group activity planned focusing on something this child is interested in. The activity can be as simple as coloring or a game of Red Light Green Light or Ring around the Rosie. As soon as the other children enter the setting, say something like: “Suzy, look!” Your friends are here, and name off their names (if you can). Let’s go and talk to them and see what fun things we can all do together!” Attempt to present the activity, but start off by having her on your lap and then gently ease her away from you even if its for short intervals. Try to have the same “routine” every time she is in your care, so she knows what to expect.

QUESTION:
I have been caring for two little girls: ages 19mos old AND 2mos. old for about two weeks now. They arrive daily at 8:00am and they leave at 6:00pm daily. The problem is that their mother calls me every two hours to chat. I want to tell her that she can’t call that much because it is interfering with my care for the children. I’ve tried to tell her that I am changing pampers or in the process of fixing lunch and I’ll talk to her when she gets home but, that hasn’t helped, she just says OK and calls me later.

ANSWER:
I would suggest sitting mom down and talking to her in person. Let her know that you really enjoy visiting with her, but that it will have to wait for pickup or drop off time. Make it clear that her continuous calls are disrupting your care for the children.

If she wants to call and check on the kids that’s fine, but need to limit your phone use during daycare hours. When she calls next time, keep it short and sweet. Let mom know how her kids are doing, tell her to have a great day and that you will talk to her later and politely hang up the phone.

You may have to speak with her about this several times, each time be polite, but firm with your request to limit the phone calls. This will take patience on your part and consistency in keeping the calls brief. She should eventually “get” the idea.

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